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Wednesday, 26 July 2006

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» university attire from orgtheory.net
Teppo Call me old-fashioned (I know, I know) - but I think I agree with Santiago Iniguez that formal dress (anything close to business casual suffices) for class creates a more respectful learning atmosphere. (Bainbridge seems to agree). These days its... [Read More]

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Alisya

I suspect that's thereason general public want to read blog....Internet visitors generally create blogs to declare themselves or their secret views. Blog grant them same matter on the monitor screen what they specifically needed,so as the above stuffs declared it.

Anonymous

If there are problems with a particular employee dressing badly or not maintaining proper hygiene, the option of setting a dress code for all staff members is an easy, non-confrontational way of solving a problem.

Delaney J. Kirk

It's a sign of respect. I would dress up for a meeting with business executives--why wouldn't I at least wear business casual to show that I care enough about my students to make the effort? I also see our role as professors to be rolemodeling what it takes to be successful in the work world...thus dress, attendance, being on time, are all important.

Der Chao Chen

Ideas come up with my intuite.

I believe that will be an interesting issue but may also need to consider the interaction between colleagues, office design, job functions, etc. to make that kind of survey/study

Just another interesting inquiry about dress code, looking at those academic conference we have attend, is there any dress code over those occasions of academic dialog?

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